Summer 2016: 3,300 nm

During June-August we logged about 3,300 nm; the longest summer sailing we’ve done so far. We visited Bergen, Husavik (Iceland), Isafjördur, Reykjavik, Torshavn, Lerwick and Skagen.

One of the crew, freelance journalist and PR-consultant Herwig Decker (who found us through  www.7knots.com), wrote a couple of articles about the sail for his local newspapers in Bavaria.

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Nav lights

Originally, the connection for the navigation lights at the bow pulpit is made with screw terminals located in the chain locker. And with domestic-use copper wiring. Obviously, it doesn’t take long for the terminals and the wiring to corrode, mainly due to seawater entering the chain locker when sailing close-hauled.

We replaced the wiring from the lanterns with tinned copper wire, routed the wires via water proof ports in the chain locker bulkhead into the fore cabin, where the connections were located as part of the new hawse pipe installation.

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New tinned copper wire straight from the lanterns on the bow pulpit exit the chain locker thru water proof ports into the forepeak

Will it ever become a boat again?

Every winter it’s the same story; lot’s of maintenance and upgrade projects going on. The boat turns into something resembling a disorganized recycling center. But then things start to fall into place and after a final rush of getting the masts back on, it’s time to put the tools away and sail.

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Mainly because of weather conditions, some contractor outsourcing (usually machining and welding), delivery times of goods ordered and time to do research, we need to have several projects going simultaneously.

Replacing odd lighting fixtures

Some time in its almost 40 year history, Anna had been fitted with two very odd ceiling lighting fixtures; one in the forward head and one in the passageway between the salon and forepeak. They really ruin the beautiful interior of the boat and gives it a haphazard look. But we’ve been searching in vain for the old style. Then suddenly they just popped up on some web site in Germany.

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Forward head. OK, it’s LED, but it doesn’t even cover the holes of the old fixture.

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Passageway. Ehhh…

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New (left) fixture is a very close match to old ones

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This is what to search for when looking for replacement fixtures

New windlass

Our windlass, a Simpson-Lawrence SL-519, has been running fine. While a creature comfort, any electric windlass has some disadvantages;

  • Requires engine to run to operate
  • Manual back-up is painfully slow
  • No feel for how hard the anything is stuck
  • If anything gets stuck and fuse is triggered, it requires  a trip below to reset the fuse
  • Adds to general complication of boat

This got us thinking about a manual double-action, two-geared Simpson-Lawrence SL-555 Sea Tiger. When we happened to stumble on one, brand new (!), from Trafalgar Yacht Services (www.westerly-yachts.co.uk), the project somehow started realizing itself. Especially when we saw from the original drawings of the HR41, that Olle Enderlein had intended the windlass to be located aft of the bow locker; just were we felt it would be better situated (mainly for getting weight aft and a better drop for the chain into the chain locker.

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Olle Enderlein, who designed the HR41 in 1975 and more than 120 other boats between 1946 and 1987, intended the windlass to be located just aft of the chain locker

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Base for windlass on bowsprit

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Epoxying new oversized holes

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Fiberglassing new hawse pipe running thru forecabin. The two forward bolts are centered in the bulkhead between the forecabin and bow locker

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40mm oak beam glassed in, taking the two aft bolts

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Mahogany covering of oak beam and hawse pipe

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Removing old base and preparing for new teak planking

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Bulkhead thickness increased from ca 15 to 45 mm in order to accommodate washer diameter of forward bolts of windlass. The added plywood, epoxied over with fiber glass, is also glassed to the underside of the deck.

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Job finished.

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… and then we had to sew a cover.

 

Grounding plate

On our quest against corrosion, we have fitted a grounding plate, which takes the grounding wire instead of being connected to the ground thru shore power. Our solution follows the basic concept by Magnus Sterky; http://www.batteknik.se/landstrom/manual2.pdf

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Grounding plate on outside of hull

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Bronze thru hull post just below shore power intake and fuse box. Not yet connected.

 

Sacrificial anode

The anode on the propeller shaft wears out in two seasons. We also had a problem with corrosion of the heat exchanger (a new one was provided by Vetus under warranty) and corrosion of the ball valve on the sea water intake for the engine.

To hopefully avoid premature death of our new engine and other fittings, we have fitted a small pen anode in the sea water circuit of the engine as well as a 5 kg anode on the hull, wired into the engine. Let’s see what happens…

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As close to the propeller and sea water intake as possible, with a free line of sight to both.

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Bronze thru hull post connects the zinc anode to the 16 mm2 tinned copper wire from the engine